TC Smout Lecture Series

In 2013, to celebrate the eightieth birthday of Prof. T.C. Smout, Historiographer Royal in Scotland and patron of the ISHR, the founder of the ISHR, Prof. Roger Mason, launched the T.C. Smout Lecture in Scottish History.


2017

To be announced …

 


2016

Sir George Mackenzie and The Stuarts

Kneller, Godfrey; Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh (1636-1691), King's Advocate; National Library of Scotland; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/sir-george-mackenzie-of-rosehaugh-16361691-kings-advocate-186011

Kneller, Godfrey; Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh (1636-1691), King’s Advocate; National Library of Scotland; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/sir-george-mackenzie-of-rosehaugh-16361691-kings-advocate-186011

The fourth annual TC Smout lecture was delivered by Dr Clare Jackson,  Senior Tutor, Trinity Hall, University of Cambridge, at the University of St Andrews, 29 September 2016, at 5:30 pm.  The lecture took place in the Arts Lecture Theatre, followed by a wine reception in the foyer.

Sir George Mackenzie of Rosehaugh (c.1636-91) would have been an energetic – if partisan – predecessor to Professor Christopher Smout as Historiographer Royal of Scotland. Popularly caricatured as ‘Bluidy Mackenzie’ in Covenanting legend, Mackenzie’s staunch defence of the Stuart dynasty underpinned his political theorising, histories of the Scottish nation and jurisprudential writings. But as this lecture illustrates, Mackenzie’s own relationship with his actual Stuart masters was more complex, and twice led to his relinquishing his post as King’s Advocate on grounds of conscience. Fearing assassination for his actions on the Stuart kings’ behalf, Mackenzie left Scotland in 1689, ruefully acknowledging that ‘My bigotry for the royal family and monarchy is and has been very troublesome to me.’

tc-smout-lecture

Dr Clare Jackson is pictured here with ISHR director Prof Roger Mason and Prof TC Smout

Dr Jackson has a particular interest in the politics of multiple monarchy in 17th-century Britain; her most recent publication is Charles II (2016) in the Penguin Monarchs series. She is also the author of Restoration Scotland, 1660-1690: Royalist politics, religion and ideas (2003), and over twenty articles on aspects of early modern British history.  She has been a regular contributor to BBC Radio 4’s In our Time, and presented a three-part television series on The Stuarts for BBC2 in 2014, followed by a sequel, The Stuarts in Exile (2015).

 


2015

The annual T. C. Smout lecture in Scottish History was delivered by Prof Sir Tom Devine on Thursday 8 October at 7pm in the Arts Lecture Theatre.  Entitled ‘Scotland and Slavery: Amnesia and Denial,’ the lecture endeavored to resolve a historical puzzle:

The international Scotland and Slavery Project reveals in great detail the full extent of the nation’s involvement at all levels of the Atlantic slave systems between the mid seventeenth and early nineteenth centuries (the results are published in T. M. Devine (ed.), Recovering Scotland’s Slavery Past (Edinburgh University Press, 2015)). Yet until the last decade or so Scottish academic history, creative literature and public discourse were virtually silent on this controversial subject. When it was occasionally broached, the assumption was that Scots had little to do with chattel slavery. That nefarious business was essentially seen to be the preserve and monopoly of the English, and especially of the ports of Bristol, Liverpool and London. This lecture will seek explanations for amnesia and denial over the long run from the end of slavery in the British empire in 1833 to the new research of more recent times which has served to demolish the old mythologies.

Professor Sir Tom Devine is Sir William Fraser Professor Emeritus of Scottish History and Palaeography in the University of Edinburgh. He previously held Chairs in Scottish History and Irish-Scottish Studies at Strathclyde and Aberdeen Universities respectively. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Honorary Member of the Royal Irish Academy and Fellow of the British Academy. He has been awarded several prizes and honorary degrees throughout his career, notably the Royal Gold Medal, Scotland’s supreme academic accolade, by HM The Queen on the recommendation of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. His next book will be Independence or Union: Scotland’s Past and Scotland’s Present to be published by Allen Lane: The Penguin Press in April 2016. Tom Devine was knighted in 2014 ‘for services to the study of Scottish history’.


2014

The 2014 T.C. Smout Lecture in Scottish History was delivered by Professor Christopher A. Whatley on ‘“Burns by an Englishman is impossible”: sculptors, statues and the contested memory of Robert Burns.’

Britain, it has been said, went ‘statue mad’ in the Victorian and Edwardian eras.  In Scotland (and North America) numerous statues of Robert Burns were erected. Professor Whatley’s lecture explored the reasons for the surge of enthusiasm for permanent memorials of a poet who had died in 1796. What was also be revealed were the personal, ideological, and aesthetic tensions that characterized many of the statue building projects, and the furious – and frank – debates that followed as towns and sculptors vied with other to erect a fitting monument to the ‘Poet of the Scotch’ during a period of political reform, urban improvement and intensifying Scottish national sentiment.

Professor Whatley is Emeritus Professor in Scottish History at the University of Dundee, where until recently he was Vice-Principal. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh and author of an acclaimed series of books and articles on modern Scottish history, notably Scottish Society, 1707-1830 : Beyond Jacobitism, Towards Industrialization (2000) and The Scots and the Union (2006; revd edn 2014).


2013
The inaugural lecture was presented by Professor Fredrik Jonsson of the University of Chicago on “Enlightenment’s Frontier: the Scottish Highlands and the Origins of Environmentalism.” The University Principal, Prof. Louise Richardson, took the chair. At the end of the lecture Prof. Smout gave an address.