Re-thinking the Renaissance and Reformation in Scotland

Re-thinking the Renaissance and Reformation in Scotland:
A Conference in Honour of Roger A. Mason, Professor of Scottish History

Saturday 13 October 2018
Parliament Hall, University of St Andrews

Reconstruction of St Salvator’s Chapel. Photo courtesy of Smart History

The Institute of Scottish Historical Research is pleased to announce the hosting of a one-day conference in honour of Professor Roger Mason. Featuring contributions from leading scholars, this conference will examine how we define and date these two movements in Scotland, particularly as a result of Professor Mason’s extensive work on Scottish renaissance culture, and intellectual and textual history. The major themes to be discussed on the day include political thought in Scotland; new ways of looking at the renaissance and reformation in Scotland; Knox, Buchanan and James VI; the intersection of politics, history and literature; and renaissance literature and iconography.

Please see the attached programme for the full schedule. The event is free and a buffet lunch will be provided, but places are limited. If you would like to attend, please email Dr Malcolm Petrie (mp49@st-andrews.ac.uk) by Friday 5 October to register.

SCOTLAND AND THE EUROPEAN REFERENDUMS

SCOTLAND AND THE EUROPEAN REFERENDUMS
CONTEXT AND CONSEQUENCES
FRIDAY 27 APRIL 2018, PARLIAMENT HALL, ST ANDREWS
 
The School of History at the University of St Andrews is pleased to announce the hosting of a one-day workshop, to be held on Friday 27 April, that will examine the political and constitutional impact for Scotland of the two referendums held regarding the relationship between the United Kingdom and Europe. Alongside contributions from academics working across a range of disciplines, the event will feature contributions from politicians, journalists and civil servants, including Catherine Stihler MEP, Alex Neil MSP, Jim Sillars, Neal Ascherson and Professor Jim Gallagher. Please see the attached programme for the full schedule.
The event is free and a buffet lunch will be provided, but places are limited. If you would like to attend, please email Dr Malcolm Petrie (mp49@st-andrews.ac.uk) by 5pm Monday 23 April to register.

Face to Face: Stories from the Asylum

Face to Face: Stories from the Asylum
An exhibition on the lives of Victorian patients at Dundee Royal Lunatic Asylum

reproduced with permission of University of Dundee Archive Services

Tower Foyer Gallery, University of Dundee
23 March – 9 June 2018: Mon – Fri 09:30 – 19:00 Sat 13:00 – 17:00
Admission free

Currently on display at the University of Dundee, Face to Face: Stories from the Asylum is a new exhibition exploring the lives of nine patients admitted to Dundee Royal Lunatic Asylum around the turn of the twentieth century. Researched and curated by St Andrews PhD student Morag Allan Campbell, the exhibition aims to promote awareness and discussion about present day mental health issues by uncovering the experience of mental illness in the past, and is a collaboration between the University of St Andrews and University of Dundee Archive Services.

Using photographs and information from their case notes, the exhibition tells each patient’s story – where they came from, the circumstances that brought them to the asylum and the dilemmas faced by their families. Their diagnoses and treatment are explained within the context of how mental illness was understood during that period, and their stories are also placed within the local historical background of late nineteenth/early twentieth century Dundee.

reproduced with permission of University of Dundee Archive Services

The exhibition is one strand of a wider project, Promoting Mental Health through the Lessons of History, based at the University of St Andrews and led by Prof. Rab Houston of the School of History. The project also includes Rab’s highly successful podcast series exploring the history of psychiatry in Britain and Ireland since 1500, currently available on SoundCloud and now into a third series.

Face to Face: Stories from the Asylum, will be on display in the Tower Foyer Gallery from March 23 until June 9th, and a number of associated events are planned, including talks, a panel discussion and a creative writing workshop.

Further information is available on the exhibition website: http://arts.st-andrews.ac.uk/facetoface/

You can also follow us on Twitter and Facebook @FacetoFaceStA

Immortalized Memory: Iterations and adaptations of the work of Robert Burns

Thursday 25th January 2018, Old Class Library, St John’s House, 70-72 South Street, St Andrews.

Institute of Scottish Historical Research.

Please join us for a special workshop, marking the anniversary of Robert Burns. This half-day event, sponsored by the St Andrews Institute of Scottish Historical Research, offers an interdisciplinary discussion of the social, cultural, and political memorialization of Robert Burns.

The event is free and open to all. However, for catering purposes, please register your interest with Dr Sean Murphy, sm314@st-andrews.ac.uk.

2.00 – 2.50pm, Panel I: Nineteenth-century perspectives.

The Kirk’s Alarm: Burns and the Church in mid-Victorian Scotland.
Professor Christopher Whatley, (University of Dundee).

A pre-emptive legacy? Robert Burns, the Pennsylvania ‘Scots-Irishman’, and the ‘Rustic Bard’ of New Hampshire.
Dr Sean Murphy, (University of St Andrews).

Tea and coffee break.

3.10 – 4.00pm, Panel II: Burns in post-war politics and writing.

‘See yonder poor’: Burns and the Welfare State (1940s-1950s).
Paul Malgrati, (University of St Andrews).

‘Fiction is not concerned with conclusions’: How James Barke remembered Robert Burns.
Kevin Gallagher, (University of Glasgow).

Tea and coffee break.

4.15 – 5.10pm, Panel III: Robert Burns and contemporary Scots poetry.

Why I write in Scots.
Mhairi Owens, (University of St Andrews).

Selected readings and concluding remarks.
Professor Robert Crawford.

Wine (and whisky) reception.

Dress and Décor: Domestic Textiles and Personal Adornment in Scotland up to 1700

23-24 March 2018, St John’s House, University of St Andrews

The Institute of Scottish Historical Research (University of St Andrews) is pleased to invite papers for Dress and Décor: Domestic Textiles and Personal Adornment in Scotland up to 1700, an interdisciplinary workshop to be held at the University of St Andrews in March 2018 as part of ISHR’s tenth-anniversary celebrations. With panel discussions and four diverse keynote presentations, the conference will seek to bring together a wide range of researchers from the burgeoning fields of Scottish history and dress and textile history in an interdisciplinary environment.
We hope to include a wide range of perspectives on the study of material culture history, including speakers from academic institutions, museum professionals, archaeologists, and historical crafts practitioners, and we welcome postgraduate students and early career/unaffiliated researchers.
Proposals for papers of 20 minutes in length will be accepted until 15th December 2017. Please see our CFP for submission details.

Historical Conversations Series – University of Glasgow

A free public programme of talks, interviews and panel discussions hosted by the University of Glasgow. Each event will include pop up exhibitions with items from the Glasgow University Library Special Collections.

All events will be held in the lecture theatre of the Kelvin Hall on Tuesdays, starting at 5.30.

For full details and to register click here.

PROGRAMME

19 September 2017: Opening Conversation, Semester 1
T.C. Smout
Chair: Catriona Macdonald
This event is followed by a wine reception sponsored by the Hunterian Museum.

10 October 2017: Medieval Panel
Steve Boardman; Dauvit Broun; Stephen Driscoll
Chair: Thomas Clancy

31 October 2017: Early Modern Panel
Keith Brown; Roger Mason
Chair: Ali Cathcart

14 November 2017: Modern Scotland: cultural, political and social perspectives
Callum Brown; Richard Finlay; W. Hamish Fraser
Chair: Catriona Macdonald

5 December 2017: Eighteenth Century Scotland
Allan Macinnes; Murray Pittock; Chris Whatley
Chair: Stephen Mullen

16 Jan 2018: Opening Conversation, Semester 2
T.M. Devine
Chair: Brian Taylor (BBC)

30 Jan 2018: Highland History
Ewen Cameron; James Hunter
Chair: Martin MacGregor

20 Feb 2018: Gender History
Lynn Abrams; Eleanor Gordon; Jane Rendall
Chair: Catriona Macdonald

13 March 2018: Scotland’s Empire/ Scotland’s Diaspora
Marjory Harper; John M. MacKenzie; Graeme Morton
Chair: Andrew Mackillop

24 April 2018: Scottish History and Scottish Literature
Henry Marsh; James Robertson
Chair: Ted Cowan
This event is followed by a wine reception sponsored by the Centre for Robert Burns Studies.

15 May 2018: Archiving Scotland
Irene O’Brien; George MacKenzie; John Scally
Chair: Lesley Richmond
This event is followed by a wine reception sponsored by Glasgow University Library.

Workshop – The British-Dutch World in the Age of Elizabeth of Bohemia

Friday, 21 April 2017, New Seminar Room, St John’s House, 69 South Street.

9.15-10.15
Welcome by Catherine Stihler MEP & Rector of the University

Miranda Lewis – Cultures of Knowledge: EMLO (Early Modern Letters Online), with a focus on WEMLO (Women’s Early Modern Letters Online) and Elizabeth of Bohemia

10.15-10.30 Coffee Break

10.30-12.00 – Chair: Steve Murdoch
Andrew R Little – The British-Dutch Maritime World in the Age of the Two Republics
Graeme Millen – Serve or Stand Down? British Regiments in the Netherlands 1648-1688

12.00-13.30 Buffet Lunch

13.30- 15.00 – Chair: Nadine Akkerman
Marika Keblusek – Curious Collections: Art and luxury objects at the Dutch Courts of Elizabeth of Bohemia
Esther Mijers – Education as Agency in the Scottish-Dutch World

15.00-15.15 Coffee Break

15.30-17.15 – Chair: Andrew Pettegree
Kirsty Rolfe – Remembering and Rewriting the ‘Palatine Cause’ in 1658-1660
Arthur der Weduwen – Britain and the Dutch newspaper trade in the seventeenth century

Round Table: The Age of Elizabeth – all speakers. Chair: Roger Mason

17.45 – ISHR Wine reception in the Undercroft.

19.00 dinner, Zizzi’s Italian Restaurant

Public lecture – Dr Nadine Akkerman

We are delighted to welcome Dr Nadine Akkerman of the University of Leiden, who will present a lecture entitled ‘Missreading Women, Misleading Women: How One Letter Changes Everything.’  The lecture will be held on Thursday 20 April, at 5.30 pm, in the Arts Lecture Theatre, and is followed by a workshop on Friday 21 April on The British-Dutch World in the Age of Elizabeth of Bohemia.  Anyone wishing to attend the workshop should contact Steve Murdoch no later than noon on Wednesday 19 April.

Elizabeth Stuart (1596-1662) was at the centre of European diplomacy, warfare and intrigue for much of her life. The daughter of James VI of Scotland, she was brought up in England following her father’s accession to the English throne in 1603. In 1613 she married the German Protestant, Frederick V, Count Palatine of the Rhine, and settled at their grand court in Heidelberg. When Frederick was elected king of Bohemia in 1619, they moved to Prague, but their reign was short-lived – earning them the soubriquets the ‘Winter Queen’ and the ‘Winter King’ – when Frederick was defeated by his Catholic rival for the throne at the battle of the White Mountain, often taken as the first engagement of the Thirty Years War. Forced to flee Bohemia, Elizabeth spent much of the rest of her life in the Hague, where she bore Frederick eight children before his death in 1632, and where she maintained a voluminous correspondence with key political, religious and cultural figures in contemporary Europe.

Dr Nadine Akkerman’s extensive research on Elizabeth has included editing three substantial volumes of her correspondence, published by Oxford University Press.

Her lecture draws on this research to explore the hitherto neglected role of women as spies in 17th century Europe. Challenging the assumption that women played little or no role in espionage, she will show how shop-keepers, singers, nurses, ladies-in-waiting, postmistresses, and women in other professions and positions operated as spies, especially during the period 1647-1667. Unlike men, these women were not restricted by codes of chivalry and honour. Sometimes they worked alone, but there is substantial evidence to suggest their involvement in secret spy networks. Hitherto unexamined archival material reveals the underground whereabouts of early modern female spies. How did early modern women spies operate differently from their male colleagues? To what extent were they successful and for what reasons? What were the advantages and restrictions of their gender? And, finally, how did female, seemingly informal, news networks intersect with the male world of high diplomacy, intelligence, and espionage? By addressing such questions, Dr Akkerman will demonstrate that early modern espionage was by no means a male preserve.

The lecture will be followed by a wine reception.

ISHR Reading Weekend 2017

This weekend saw the annual ISHR reading weekend take place at The Burn, Glenesk.  A number of ISHR members and guests gathered in these beautiful surroundings to share research in progress and catch up with events and issues in the field of Scottish history. Papers presented ranged from discussion of clothing in late medieval Scotland to the representation of Burns as ‘Scotland’s voice’ during and after the First World War. Participants also visited the nearby House of Dun, with a tour of the house itself and a chance to enjoy the sunshine in the surrounding grounds.  Once again, the hospitality of the staff at The Burn made the weekend as relaxing as as it was rewarding.

You can read more about the weekend on the School of History blog.

Enjoying the sunshine at the beautiful House of Dun. Photo attrib. Ellen Collingsworth. CC-BY-NC-ND 2.0.