SCOTLAND AND THE EUROPEAN REFERENDUMS

SCOTLAND AND THE EUROPEAN REFERENDUMS
CONTEXT AND CONSEQUENCES
FRIDAY 27 APRIL 2018, PARLIAMENT HALL, ST ANDREWS
 
The School of History at the University of St Andrews is pleased to announce the hosting of a one-day workshop, to be held on Friday 27 April, that will examine the political and constitutional impact for Scotland of the two referendums held regarding the relationship between the United Kingdom and Europe. Alongside contributions from academics working across a range of disciplines, the event will feature contributions from politicians, journalists and civil servants, including Catherine Stihler MEP, Alex Neil MSP, Jim Sillars, Neal Ascherson and Professor Jim Gallagher. Please see the attached programme for the full schedule.
The event is free and a buffet lunch will be provided, but places are limited. If you would like to attend, please email Dr Malcolm Petrie (mp49@st-andrews.ac.uk) by 5pm Monday 23 April to register.

Immortalized Memory: Iterations and adaptations of the work of Robert Burns

Thursday 25th January 2018, Old Class Library, St John’s House, 70-72 South Street, St Andrews.

Institute of Scottish Historical Research.

Please join us for a special workshop, marking the anniversary of Robert Burns. This half-day event, sponsored by the St Andrews Institute of Scottish Historical Research, offers an interdisciplinary discussion of the social, cultural, and political memorialization of Robert Burns.

The event is free and open to all. However, for catering purposes, please register your interest with Dr Sean Murphy, sm314@st-andrews.ac.uk.

2.00 – 2.50pm, Panel I: Nineteenth-century perspectives.

The Kirk’s Alarm: Burns and the Church in mid-Victorian Scotland.
Professor Christopher Whatley, (University of Dundee).

A pre-emptive legacy? Robert Burns, the Pennsylvania ‘Scots-Irishman’, and the ‘Rustic Bard’ of New Hampshire.
Dr Sean Murphy, (University of St Andrews).

Tea and coffee break.

3.10 – 4.00pm, Panel II: Burns in post-war politics and writing.

‘See yonder poor’: Burns and the Welfare State (1940s-1950s).
Paul Malgrati, (University of St Andrews).

‘Fiction is not concerned with conclusions’: How James Barke remembered Robert Burns.
Kevin Gallagher, (University of Glasgow).

Tea and coffee break.

4.15 – 5.10pm, Panel III: Robert Burns and contemporary Scots poetry.

Why I write in Scots.
Mhairi Owens, (University of St Andrews).

Selected readings and concluding remarks.
Professor Robert Crawford.

Wine (and whisky) reception.