ISHR Seminar – Prof Steve Boardman

The next ISHR seminar will take place on Thursday 23 February when Steve Boardman, Professor in Scottish History at the University of Edinburgh, and ISHR Visiting Scholar during this academic year, will present ‘Bucktooth, Earl Beardie, and the Black Knight: Names and by-names in late medieval Scotland.’

Steve’s paper examines naming patterns within the late medieval Scottish nobility. The first part of the paper looks at baptismal names and, while acknowledging the deep conservatism that determined name choice in general, attempts to trace and explain the growing popularity of ‘new’ names such as George, Ninian and Duthac. In the second half of the paper the focus is on the positive or condemnatory nicknames or bynames earned by, or imposed on, particular noblemen and what these appellations might tell us about the political, social and cultural world of the late medieval Scottish aristocracy.

The seminar will be held in the New Seminar Room, St John’s House, 71 South Street, St Andrews at 5.30pm. Drinks and nibbles will be served from 5.15pm.

New publication explores the life and works of Robert Baillie

The Institute of Scottish Historical Research is delighted to announce the publication in the St Andrews Studies in Scottish History series of Alexander D. Campbell’s The Life and Works of Robert Baillie (1602-1662) Politics, Religion and Record-Keeping in the British Civil Wars.

9781783271849_1From 1637 to 1660, the Scots witnessed rapid and confused changes in government and violent skirmishing, whilst impassioned religious disputes divided neighbours, friends and family. One of the most vivid accounts of this period may be found in the letters of the Glaswegian minister, Robert Baillie; but whilst his correspondence has long featured in historical accounts of the period, the man behind these writings has largely been forgotten.

Based on the first, systematic reading of Baillie’s extensive surviving manuscripts, comprising thousands of leaves of correspondence, treatises, sermons, and notebooks, this biography draws together for the first time an analysis of Baillie’s career and writings, establishing his significance as a polemicist, minister, theologian, and contemporary historian.

Alexander D. Campbell is Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Post-Doctoral Fellow, Queen’s University, Canada.

The Life and Works of Robert Baillie (1602-1662) Politics, Religion and Record-Keeping in the British Civil Wars is available now from the Boydell and Brewer website.